blog

Eco Bush Escapade @ Pel’s Post, Kruger

Eco Bush Escapade @ Pel’s Post, Kruger

December 14, 2020

Step into the stark wilderness of Northern Kruger at Pafuri, one of the most bio-diverse and untouched bushvelds of South Africa, and be swathed in luxury at Pel’s Post.

Resting up on the crag, with views of the Luvuvhu River below, Pel’s Post is as far removed as can be from a regular safari lodge. Four stand-alone ‘Stilesuites’ – Suites on Stilts – are modern design spaces that let the light pervade through a large terrace offering splendid 180-degree views. Lavishly sized, the suites are contemporary-chic in design and locally inspired art speckle the interiors. Waking up to the sunrise sweeping over the endless expanse of wilderness is absolutely blissful! And if you are travelling with family and friends, it doubles up perfectly as an exclusive-use lodge.

Blending bush with plush, Pel’s Post stands out for championing lighter carbon footprints by sourcing sustainable and renewable sources for its construction and adopting a solar-powered, eco-friendly facilities-management system.

In the heart of the Limpopo Transfrontier “Peace” Park, sharing a border with Zimbabwe and Mozambique, Pel’s Post boasts more than 80% of Kruger’s bio-diversity and offers one of the best game viewing opportunities.

Declared a Ramsar Wetland Site, over 300 species of bird sightings have been recorded, a definite birder’s paradise!

With your own private vehicle, the passionate guides deftly guide you through safaris and sightings and can even organize interest-led bush walks. They take you through the diverse terrain of the region explaining about the varied flora that includes mopane woodlands, fever tree forests and acacia thickets that are endemic to this remote corner of the Kruger National Park. The idea is to take to the forests organically, no rushed and frenzied itinerary or route – perfect!

It is not just the wildlife that will keep you enraptured here. Go exploring all about the stunning Lanner Gorge, dating back to 250 million years and the history of the Makuleke people native to the area.

What is truly distinctive here are some of the largest and oldest baobabtrees that seem to have peppered the landscape naturally and beautifully. Native to Madagascar, mainland Africa and Australia, these trees have been carbon-dated back by 1400 years. Sit under these giant canopies for a picnic lunch – totally otherworldly!